Cancer Council and skin cancer research

Australia has one of the highest rates of skin cancer in the world, with two in three Australians diagnosed with skin cancer by the age of 70.

Funds raised through The Longest Day 2018 will be invested in a world-class skin cancer research project right here in Victoria, through Cancer Council Victoria’s Grants in Aid program.

Our Grants in Aid program is 100% donor-funded and supports ground-breaking cancer research teams in Victorian hospitals, universities and medical institutions to improve cancer diagnosis and treatment.

Over two decades ago, less than half of people diagnosed with cancer in Victoria survived five years after their diagnosis.

The five-year survival rate has now increased to 68%, thanks to progress and breakthroughs in cancer treatments and diagnosis, none of which is possible without generous supporters.

Cancer Council

Cancer Council has an international reputation for innovative work in cancer research, prevention and support. Our mission is to prevent cancer, empower patients through providing information and support, and save lives.

As an independent, not-for-profit organisation, we rely on the generosity of the Victorian community to continue our important work.

The Longest Day funding updates

Dermatoscopes for Victorian GP’s to better detect skin cancer

A dermatoscope

It is estimated that more than 1,900 Australians die each year from melanoma.

Early detection is crucial for skin cancer prevention, as most skin cancer can be successfully treated if it is found early. But without treatment, skin cancer can be deadly.

$200,000 of total funds raised through The Longest Day 2017 will be used to provide training and devices for Victorian GP’s to better detect skin cancer.

120 handheld skin microscopes called dermatoscopes that allow doctors to look more closely at skin lesions and supportive training will be provided to Victorian GP’s for the early detection of skin cancer, particularly in regional areas where there is a lack of dermatologists.

Doctors who have a dermatoscope and proper training will find more melanomas at an earlier stage with fewer excisions, which means more lives can be saved, there are less unnecessary procedures and people can access resources where they are most needed.

The provision of dermatoscopes and proper training will mean that everyone across Victoria can access cancer services, without the need of invasive treatment or a hospital visit.

Australia has one of the highest rates of skin cancer in the world, with two in three Australians diagnosed with skin cancer by the age of 70.

Funds raised through The Longest Day 2018 will be invested into life-saving skin cancer research.

Over two decades ago, less than half of people diagnosed with cancer in Australia survived five years after their diagnosis.

The five-year survival rate has now increased to 68%, thanks to progress and breakthroughs in cancer treatments and diagnosis, none of which is possible without generous supporters.

Cancer Council

Cancer Council has an international reputation for innovative work in cancer research, prevention and support. Our mission is to prevent cancer, empower patients through providing information and support, and save lives.

As an independent, not-for-profit organisation, we rely on the generosity of our community to continue our important work.

Funds raised at community events are making a difference to Queenslanders impacted by skin cancer.

Dr Graham Leggatt’s study is looking at alternative treatment options for non-melanoma skin cancers which are the most commonly diagnosed cancers in Australia. Commonly these cancers are removed by surgical excision which can lead to unwanted scarring, especially on the head and neck. Watch below to learn more about this project which is funded through community events like The Longest Day.

About Cancer Council

We believe in a cancer free future. There are things that we can all do every day to help make this happen. Together with our volunteers, supporters, stakeholders and staff, we are committed to reducing the impact of cancer on individuals and the community.

Every year in NSW alone, more than 48,000 new cases of cancer are expected to be diagnosed, and the impact on families, carers and communities is significant. Cancer Council is the only charity to work across every area of every cancer, from research to prevention and support. We help people from the point of diagnosis through to treatment and survivorship.

Cancer Council and skin cancer

Australia has one of the highest rates of skin cancer in the world, with two in three Australians diagnosed with skin cancer by the age of 70.

In NSW men over the age of 40 are 1.5 times likely to be diagnosed and about twice as likely to die of melanoma as women of a similar age.

Funds raised through The Longest Day 2018 could help fund world-class skin cancer research projects like Dr Umaimainthan Palendira’s study on treatments for melanoma and prevention programs, like Improve Your Long Game, which focuses on improving the sun protection habits of male golfers over 40.

Research project: Improving immunotherapy for melanoma

Background

Immunotherapy is treatment that helps the body’s immune system fight cancer. It is effective in many cancer types, but more than half of patients who are treated don’t respond. This not only delays alternative treatment for those patients but since the treatments are costly, it also drains healthcare budgets

The research

It’s thought immunotherapy works by ‘releasing the brakes’ that stop the immune system attacking and killing cancer cells. Dr Palendira’s team at Centenary Institute are targeting cells known as Tumour-resident Immune (TRI) cells as a key to this process. Their project will fully characterise TRI cells to work out what is special about them, how they might be controlled, and how they might be used to predict who will respond to immunotherapy.

The impact

The goal of this project is improve the outcomes and survival of all people affected by melanoma by creating new strategies to treat cancer and/or improve the effectiveness of current treatments.

Improve Your Long Game

Improve Your Long Game, focuses on improving the sun protection habits of male golfers over 40.

Improve Your Long Game 2018 - Paul Gow from Cancer Council NSW on Vimeo.

“It’s never too late to reduce the risk of melanoma. Look out for yourself, look out for your mates and improve your long game.”

–  Paul Gow, Pro Golfer and Cancer Council NSW Ambassador.

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